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Places

Bayley Tavern

c.1690
Portsmouth Ave

While the date of the house’s erection is unclear, part of it may have been standing as early as 1690. It was enlarged, and used as a public house or tavern in 1765. For a time, church services were held here during the winter months as it was heated. The tavern was operated by the Bayley family from 1776 to 1840, after which the Pickering family kept the business for a few years more.

Berry Homestead

c.1736
Breakfast Hill Road

Located on Breakfast Hill Road, this house was erected by Thomas Berry, son of William Berry who was an early settler in Rye in 1632. The Eastern Railroad line once ran to the west of the house across Breakfast Hill Road.
This house was occupied in 1776 by Thomas Berry Jr., a descendant of William Berry who was the first settler in
Rye 1n 1632. Erected circa 1736 by Thomas Berry, the present house still bears the original clapboards, wrought
nails and some of the glass in the attic windows, although there are some modern changes including the stone piazza
and bay window. The present owner is Doctor Emer Sewall, the eighth generation to reside there. His daughter,
Janet, is the current resident and represents the ninth generation to live there and the twelth generation to live in the
New Hampshire seacoast area since 1631.

Bethany Church

2000
500 Breakfast Hill Road

Tracing their roots to the original Rye congregation in 1726, the church on Breakfast Hill is the largest of several facilities belonging to the Bethany Congregation.

Breakfast Hill


511 Breakfast Hill Road

On the morning of June 26, 1696, a band of Abenaki and their captives from an attack on Portsmouth Plains were found eating their breakfast in Greenland. When confronted by the local militia, the Native Americans fled, leaving their plunder, prisoners, and giving a name to the hill.

Clarke Tavern

c.1727
Post Road

For a time, this was the stage coach stop and acting town post office from 1750 to 1812, when it was one of three licensed taverns in town.

Community Congregational Church of Greenland

c.1756
4 Church Ln

While the congregation can date its origins back to 1706, the current structure overlooking the Parade was erected in 1756 after a fire burned down the original on the corner of Cemetery Lane. It has seen many changes over the ages, and serves the community to this day.

Folsom Tavern

c.1750
Portsmouth Ave

While the original tavern was erected in the 1750’s, the impressive building you see today was added to it in 1810 by George Hilton, and came to be known as the Greenland House until 1866.

Greenland Central School

1920
70 Post Road

Built on the site of the Brackett Academy, which had burned down in 1919. The original stone building housed grades 1-8. Since then, it has been expanded several times, the largest and latest addition having been completed in 2004.

Greenland Parish House

c.1837
44 Post Road

Originally the First Methodist Meetinghouse, it became a parish house when the Methodist congregation merged with the Congregationalists.

Greenland United Methodist Church

1998
25 Dearborn Road

Home to a congregation of Korean-American Methodists.

Bayley Tavern

c.1690
Portsmouth Ave

While the date of the house’s erection is unclear, part of it may have been standing as early as 1690. It was enlarged, and used as a public house or tavern in 1765. For a time, church services were held here during the winter months as it was heated. The tavern was operated by the Bayley family from 1776 to 1840, after which the Pickering family kept the business for a few years more.

Berry Homestead

c.1736
Breakfast Hill Road

Located on Breakfast Hill Road, this house was erected by Thomas Berry, son of William Berry who was an early settler in Rye in 1632. The Eastern Railroad line once ran to the west of the house across Breakfast Hill Road.
This house was occupied in 1776 by Thomas Berry Jr., a descendant of William Berry who was the first settler in
Rye 1n 1632. Erected circa 1736 by Thomas Berry, the present house still bears the original clapboards, wrought
nails and some of the glass in the attic windows, although there are some modern changes including the stone piazza
and bay window. The present owner is Doctor Emer Sewall, the eighth generation to reside there. His daughter,
Janet, is the current resident and represents the ninth generation to live there and the twelth generation to live in the
New Hampshire seacoast area since 1631.

Bethany Church

2000
500 Breakfast Hill Road

Tracing their roots to the original Rye congregation in 1726, the church on Breakfast Hill is the largest of several facilities belonging to the Bethany Congregation.

Breakfast Hill


511 Breakfast Hill Road

On the morning of June 26, 1696, a band of Abenaki and their captives from an attack on Portsmouth Plains were found eating their breakfast in Greenland. When confronted by the local militia, the Native Americans fled, leaving their plunder, prisoners, and giving a name to the hill.

Clarke Tavern

c.1727
Post Road

For a time, this was the stage coach stop and acting town post office from 1750 to 1812, when it was one of three licensed taverns in town.

Community Congregational Church of Greenland

c.1756
4 Church Ln

While the congregation can date its origins back to 1706, the current structure overlooking the Parade was erected in 1756 after a fire burned down the original on the corner of Cemetery Lane. It has seen many changes over the ages, and serves the community to this day.

Folsom Tavern

c.1750
Portsmouth Ave

While the original tavern was erected in the 1750’s, the impressive building you see today was added to it in 1810 by George Hilton, and came to be known as the Greenland House until 1866.

Greenland Central School

1920
70 Post Road

Built on the site of the Brackett Academy, which had burned down in 1919. The original stone building housed grades 1-8. Since then, it has been expanded several times, the largest and latest addition having been completed in 2004.

Greenland Parish House

c.1837
44 Post Road

Originally the First Methodist Meetinghouse, it became a parish house when the Methodist congregation merged with the Congregationalists.

Greenland United Methodist Church

1998
25 Dearborn Road

Home to a congregation of Korean-American Methodists.